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Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

6 edition of Cooperative breeding in mammals found in the catalog.

Cooperative breeding in mammals

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  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge, U.K, New York, NY, USA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Mammals -- Behavior.,
  • Cooperative breeding in animals.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementedited by Nancy G. Solomon, Jeffrey A. French.
    ContributionsSolomon, Nancy G., French, Jeffrey A.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL739.3 .C665 1997
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiii, 390 p. :
    Number of Pages390
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL980450M
    ISBN 100521454913
    LC Control Number96017982

    Among vertebrates, cooperative breeding is found in at least 9% of birds, 3% of mammals, and in a few fish species, with particularly high frequencies in the oscine passerines (true songbirds), Australian landbirds, and primates.   Journal of Human Evolution has two papers dealing with the phenomenon of cooperative breeding in humans, primates and mammals. Cooperative breeding (a.k.a. allomaternal care) describes such a social or kinship system in which nonmaternal helpers support offspring who are not their own.

    "Cooperative" or "communal" breeding occurs when more than two birds of the same species provide care in rearing the young from one 3 percent (approximately species) of bird species worldwide are cooperative breeders. There are two types of cooperative arrangements: those in which mature nonbreeders ("helpers-at-the-nest" or "auxiliaries") help .   Several hypotheses propose that cooperative breeding leads to increased cognitive performance, in both nonhuman and human primates, but systematic evidence for such a relationship is missing. A causal link might exist because motivational and cognitive processes necessary for the execution and coordination of helping behaviors could also favor cognitive Cited by:

      Many examples of cooperation between non-kin in animal societies, including cooperative foraging or hunting, cooperative defence of territories and mates and cooperative construction of nests and. Discovered cooperative breeding while studying the nesting behavior of neotropical birds in Guatemala and Costa Rica. Noticed that some individuals of the same species different from the mating pair would come and feed the nestlings. Knew from their coloring.


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Cooperative breeding in mammals Download PDF EPUB FB2

Among vertebrates, cooperative breeding is expressed most prominently in birds and mammals. The book explores the phenomenon in a wide variety of mammals, including rodents, primates, viverrids, and carnivores.

Comparative studies of cooperative breeding provide important tests for the origin and maintenance of sociality in complex groups. The contributors to this book, which is the first to be dedicated exclusively to the phenomenon, explore the evolutionary, ecological, behavioural, and physiological aspects of cooperative breeding in mammals.

First published in Contents List of contributors; Preface; Range: £ - £ Cambridge Core - Animal Behaviour - Cooperative Breeding in Vertebrates - edited by Walter D. Koenig. The contributors to this book explore the evolutionary, ecological, behavioural and physiological basis of cooperative breeding in mammals.

The book contains a collection of chapters by the leading researchers in the field, and it is dedicated exclusively to the study of mammalian cooperative breeding. Main Cooperative Breeding in Mammals.

Cooperative Breeding in Mammals Nancy G. Solomon, Jeffrey A. French. Year: Language: english. Pages: / ISBN ISBN File: PDF, MB. Preview. You can write a book review and share your experiences.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion. The contributors to this book explore the evolutionary, ecological, behavioural and physiological basis of cooperative breeding in mammals. The book contains a collection of chapters by the leading researchers in the field, and it is dedicated exclusively to the study of mammalian cooperative breeding/5(3).

Cooperative breeding in mammals. Jennions MD(1), Macdonald DW. Author information: (1)Michael Jennions and David Macdonald are at the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Dept of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK OX13PS.

Cooperative breeding in mammals covers a diversity of breeding by: Buy Cooperative Breeding in Mammals by Nancy G. Solomon, Jeffrey A. French (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low. 1. Introduction.

The evolution of cooperative breeding systems, where breeding females are assisted by non-breeding group members in protecting and feeding their offspring, poses important challenges for the theory of natural selection [1–4].Recent comparative studies of vertebrates using phylogenetic reconstruction have shown that the evolution of cooperative Cited by: Merge Alloparenting into Cooperative breeding.

Since alloparents are the non-parental care givers in cooperative breeding, perhaps the two articles can be merged and the information about alloparenting can be described sufficiently in the cooperative breeding article. -- Suntag9 August (UTC) The Allomothering article should also be merged.

Cooperative breeding refers to a social system in which individuals other than the parents provide care for the offspring. Since individuals delay breeding and invest in the offspring of others, cooperative breeding poses a challenge to a Darwinian Price: $ Cooperative breeding encompasses a range of unusually flexible monogamous, polygynous and polyandrous mating systems in which individuals of either sex may mate sequentially or at the same time with one more partners, with one common feature: group members other than genetic parents (alloparents) help to care for and provision young.

S pecies breeding in cooperative groups are more commonly found living in hot and unpredictable environments (Fig. 1) [1][2][3][4]. This well-documented relationship has long been taken as.

The Study of Cooperative Breeding From wild dogs, to elephants, meerkats, marmosets, acorn woodpeckers, and scrub jays, roughly 3% of mammals, and between 8 and 17% of bird species (Heinsohn and Double ) breed cooperatively.

The literature on cooperative breeding in vertebrates is divided between studies of birds, of mammals other than. tive breeding system. Among many nonhuman primates and mammals in gen-eral, cooperative breeding is accompanied by psychological changes leading to greater prosociality, which directly enhances performance in social cognition.

Here we propose that these cognitive consequences of cooperative breeding could have become more pervasive in the human. Cooperative breeding – in which some adults forgo independent breeding and remain as subordinates within a group helping to raise the offspring of others –.

Get this from a library. Cooperative breeding in vertebrates: studies of ecology, evolution, and behavior. [Walter D Koenig; Janis L Dickinson;] -- Cooperative breeders are species in which individuals beyond a pair assist in the production of young in a single brood or litter.

Although relatively rare, cooperative breeding is widespread. In mammals, once the costs of reproduction have increased to the extent that cooperative breeding is obligatory, they may also act as a phylogenetic constraint, explaining the frequent occurrence of delayed dispersal and cooperative breeding within certain lineages (e.g.

canids or Cited by: Cite this chapter as: Clutton-Brock T.H. () Cooperative breeding in mammals. In: Kappeler P.M., van Schaik C.P. (eds) Cooperation in Primates and by: Cooperative Breeding in Vertebrates Cooperative breeders are species in which individuals beyond a pair assist in the production of young in a single brood or litter.

Although relatively rare, cooperative breeding is wide-spread taxonomically and continues to pose challenges to our understanding of the evolution of cooperation and altruistic. Although relatively rare, cooperative breeding is widespread taxonomically and continues to pose challenges to our understanding of the evolution of cooperation and altruistic behavior.

Bringing together long-term studies of cooperatively breeding birds, mammals, and fish, this volume provides a synthesis of current studies in the field.4/5(1).Cooperative breeding refers to a social system in which individuals other than the parents provide care for the offspring. Since individuals delay breeding and invest in the offspring of others, cooperative breeding poses a challenge to a Darwinian .An introductory chapter summarizes the history of long-term studies of cooperative breeders as well as advances in our understanding of vertebrate cooperative breeding since the publication of previous versions of the book—Stacey and Koenig’s Cooperative Breeding in Birds: Long-Term Studies of Ecology and Behavior (